The Fifty Cent Tour

Tuesday, April 3, 2012

pillars of sand




a reputation on trial
dirt
from the offending transgression
under many pointed fingernails
yet
this sin was her name
her sin alone

they summoned
him
to begin the breaking
of a body to dust
locked and loaded
they waited comfortably
blind to a fault

he held up a stick
as he listened to testimonials
solid as stone towers
silently picking away
at their foundations
counting each speck
knowing each name

spelling truths in the sand
he sang
all you righteous
pitiful fools
look at the bottom
of your filthy soles
i've got news for you

eyes burned open wide
stained hands thudded stones
to earth unspent
go on and walk away
free and uneasy now
walk the way of peace
from now on

Peace ~ Rene
*Previously published and reworked for d'Verse Poets Open Link Night

17 comments:

  1. Brilliant... wait, I need to come up with a better adjective for you. I feel redundancy coming on... intriguing interpretation. That doesn't quite cover it.

    Well, you know it's great. Just keep it up.

    Cheers,

    Casey

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  2. wow, I like the while things but the second stanza is powerful. well done.

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  3. I like it, but I'm still thinking about it...

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  4. smiles. one of my favorite stories...cause i been stoned, and called a whore, but by his blood, no more, no more...

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  5. Those wacky religious goofs! What're ya gonna do with 'em?

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  6. Now I have to go to the library. I heard a lecture on that story once. The professor said that the word "wrote" in Greek was actually "wrote against" kind of like "indict." I have never checked the Greek text and the lexicon for myself. I have to go to the public library to do it. Either that or get my own interlinear Bible and Greek lexicon. Probably run me about a grand.

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  7. "the dirt of the offending
    transgression under many
    a pointed finger.."

    That is absolutely fantastic. Love it, Rene.

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  8. I know I've read work when an age-old familiar story is written in a completely different way.

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  9. Like this very much. The more times I read it, the more the little hairs on my neck stand on end.

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  10. thank you all for reading and commenting.
    I truly appreciate you comin' 'round.

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  11. still one of my favorite stories...all those fools....smiles...

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  12. The sad truth of this is that this scene is too often repeated today. Very reflective poem.

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  13. Updates a classical story with a modernist sensibility. This poem, as back then, provokes the reader into thought.

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  14. I think what makes the moment of judgment cancelled by a truer justice so satisfying is that such a moment is hard to imagine in our day, with everyone so bent on pointing their finger elsewhere that they can't see the inditement of truth that points at every heart. - Brendan

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  15. What a gift you have, Rene. I'm always happy to have landed here...

    Pearl

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  16. p.s. Yes, I know I returned. :-)

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  17. I've got news for you...





    and it's all good...

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